Apartments BIRMINGHAM AL Rental Services

Rental apartments have now turned out to be amongst the colloquial of trends across the world and more and more people have now changed their approach towards down payments of mortgages and have now turned to the rental life which is mostly hassle free. It can turn out to be one of the daunting tasks when it comes to finding out the appropriate apartment for you and that too in the city you want while keeping it reasonable in terms of price that they might have to pay in the end.

It is, however, fortunate enough that the internet has really simplified things for the apartment-hunters and has changed things drastically. People can now find adequate help from the APARTMENTS BIRMINGHAM AL rental services for finding the apartments that meet their requirements andRead More

map

Flood warning issued for Wake, Durham and Johnston counties

The National Weather Service has issued a flood warning for Durham, Wake, Johnston, Wayne and Sampson counties through 12:15 a.m. Tuesday, as rain continues to fall on saturated ground.

Upwards of two inches has fallen since mid-morning Tuesday, and another one to two inches are possible in those counties, according to the weather service. The rain will quickly run-off, causing creeks and streams to overflow their banks, the weather service said.

The rain is expected to continue into Tuesday morning before tapering off as the weather system working its way up from the south moves out and the sun shines again on Wednesday. Up to 6 inches could fall in parts of central North Carolina before the storm is all over, according to the weather service.

If the forecast is correct, it would be the most rain central North Carolina has seen since Hurricane Matthew last fall, far surpassing the 1.93 inches of rain recorded at Raleigh-Durham International Airport the first three days of January.

“We haven’t surpassed that 1.93 at the airport yet,” said meteorologist Barrett Smith said Monday morning. “But it could end up being the largest since Matthew. If not, our forecast is pretty bad.”

But people shouldn’t expect the same level of flooding as when Matthew swept through, Smith said.

“It’s not comparable in that sense,” he said. “But we’re still cautioning that there will be some flash flooding and some roads covered in water.”

Thunderstorms are expected Tuesday morning followed by more rain and then more thunderstorms after 3 p.m.

A flood watch continues for central North Carolina through Tuesday morning, and forecasters said to expect flooding in streams and creeks and standing water on roads. Rivers will rise “significantly,” but the weather service predicted only minor flooding along their banks.

The Haw River is expected to crest at Bynum on Tuesday afternoon, while the Tar River should crest at Louisburg on Wednesday afternoon and on Friday evening in Tarboro, according to National Weather Service forecasts.

[Heavy storms leave thousands without power in North Carolina]

Some areas outside the Triangle could get as much as 5 inches before the rain eases up and ends by Wednesday morning.

Source: National Weather Service

Power outages

The storm caused power outages to thousands of Duke Energy customers in North Carolina on Monday.

More than 48,000 of those customers were in Charlotte, which had received as much as 4 inches of rain by Monday morning.

More than 2,250 customers were without power in Durham near the Northgate Mall on Monday morning after downed trees or limbs damaged electrical equipment. About 500 more were without power in Cary and east Raleigh on Monday.

Related stories from The News & Observer
Area gets heavy rain, but no major flood
The sights and sounds of a rainy day in the Old North State

Other major outages were reported in the Winston-Salem area and Cabarrus County.

Abbie Bennett: 919-836-5768; @AbbieRBennett

businessman

Highlighting North Carolina’s opioid problem, Attorney General Stein visits Durham’s TROSA

DURHAM

The demographics of the men and women enrolled at Triangle Residential Options for Substance Abusers have changed dramatically in recent years as opioid usage has grown across the country.

In 2017, about 40 percent of the 500 people in TROSA’s rehabilitative programs are there because of an addiction to prescription opiates or heroin. That number was only 15 percent in 2010.

And the population has grown increasingly younger, too.

In the past two years, nearly all of the growth at TROSA has come from those under the age of 35, while the older population there has remained constant, according to TROSA Chief Operating Officer Keith Artin.

For many the story started similarly: abusing a prescription for an opiate painkiller after a broken arm or wisdom-teeth surgery.

N.C. Attorney General Josh Stein was in Durham on Tuesday to tour TROSA’s facility to learn about the nonprofit’s approach to addiction and to raise awareness of the state’s opioid problem. Stein was joined by state Sens. Floyd McKissick and Mike Woodard, and state Rep. MaryAnn Black, all Democrats from Durham.

“This is a growing crisis in North Carolina and people have to understand how serious it is – in part so that young people know to steer clear of these drugs and not mess around with them,” Stein said. “A young person can become addicted after only a few usages of these medications.”

TROSA has about 500 participants who live on the nonprofit’s Durham campus and work in its operations – which include a thrift store, moving service and annual Christmas tree sales – while undergoing treatment for addiction and training for careers. The nonprofit offers a two-year residency program that is free to participants and funded by private donations.

More than 90 percent of graduates from TROSA maintain recovery from addiction one year after graduation, and more than 90 percent are employed a year later as well.

Stein – who has made tackling opiate addiction a flagship issue for his first term in office – pointed toward the success of TROSA as an example for the state. North Carolina has four of the top 25 worst cities in the U.S. for opioid abuse, according to a report from Castlight Health, a health care information company.

“There are hundreds of thousands of North Carolinians that suffer from some form of substance use disorder,” he said, noting that only one out of 10 substance abusers received some form of treatment last year.

“We as a society aren’t doing enough to help people who want to get healthy and want to get well. That’s why we need to support groups like TROSA, and that’s why I am here today.”

Momentum is growing in the N.C. General Assembly to address opioid abuse, which has become a growing problem in the U.S. Opioid-related overdoses have quadrupled since 1999, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Earlier this year, Stein and a group of Republican lawmakers introduced the Strengthen Opioid Misuse Prevention, or STOP, Act. The bill would limit doctors to prescribing no more than a five-day supply of opioid during an initial visit to treat a patient’s pain issue, such as a broken bone, and create an electronic data system to prevent abusers from visiting different doctors.

The bill, which passed in the N.C. General Assembly’s House unanimously earlier this month, would also allocate money to abuse treatment and recover services such as TROSA, Stein said.

“This is a nonpartisan issues,” Stein said. “It affects urban and rural, it affects east and west, it affects blacks and whites and Democrats and Republicans. There’s widespread consensus that we need to take broad steps to solve this crisis.”

For its part, TROSA has received funds from the state in recent years. The nonprofit has received $3.2 million over the past two years to expand its operations, including the construction of a new building on its campus.

McKissick, who has worked with the nonprofit since it was founded in 1994, said its growth from around 50 people participating in its earlier years has been a “radical transformation.”

He said he thinks the General Assembly has done well by TROSA but added “we gotta do more.”

“There is great interest in the General Assembly about duplicating what is being done here elsewhere – perhaps in High Point, the Triad area,” he said.

diagram

NC: Durham-Orange Light-Rail Costs Could Delay Durham-Wake Commuter Rail

April 08–DURHAM — The rising costs of the Durham-Orange light rail project may delay plans for a 37-mile commuter-rail line connecting Wake and Durham counties.

The Wake County Transit Plan calls for the Wake-Durham Commuter Rail Project to connect Garner and Durham with stops in Raleigh, including N.C. State University; Cary; Morrisville and Research Triangle Park by 2027.

In November, Wake County voters agreed to raise the county’s sales tax rate by a half-cent in order to help fund the 10-year $2.3 billion transit plan, which also includes bus service improvements.

The Wake plan is based on Durham County paying 33 percent of the commuter rail’s local costs, which corresponds to the percentage of track in Durham County.

In a presentation to Durham City Council this week, GoTriangle officials indicated Durham County’s existing transit revenue streams wouldn’t support Wake’s timeline for launching the commuter rail, considering the updated financing model for the light-rail project.

Durham County’s transit fund cash balance would face a $170.6 million shortfall in fiscal year 2035 if Durham agreed to a 33 percent share and a 2027 delivery date, said John Tallmadge, who directs GoTriangle’s Regional Services Development Department.

Durham County is paying for the light-rail and commuter-rail projects with money from a half-cent transit sales tax, car rental fees and vehicle registration fees.

The commuter-rail project becomes more viable if it is pushed back 10 years, with an opening date in 2037 with Durham shouldering 20 percent of the costs. Durham County would have to pay cash for the project because financing wouldn’t be viable, Tallmadge said.

Mike Charbonneau, a GoTriangle spokesman, wrote in an email that GoTriangle is providing financial analysis of hypothetical scenarios for commuter rail.

"The Commuter Rail project in the Wake County Transit Plan is still early in the planning process," he wrote.

Will Allen, who was appointed by the Raleigh City Council to the GoTriangle board, said it was a strategic decision to present a 10-year plan to Wake voters that was aggressive and concrete. It was based on a conservative investment model that delivered and paid for all the promised items by 2027.

Allen also pointed out that Wake County tax dollars can only be spent in Wake County.

"We are restricted," he said. "We can’t pay for a mile of track in Durham County."

Delaying the plan could increase the costs due to inflation and other economic factors, he said.

"So it’s important that we meet the schedule promised to the voters," he said.

Wake commissioners’ chairman Sig Hutchinson was more optimistic about the potential financing challenges.

"We just have to get creative and find some alternative sources of funding," outside of additional Wake County funding. "We just have to do this work, and this is what we are about — we are about creating as 21st century community in which transit has got to be part of the solution."

The updated Durham Transit Plan presented to the City Council on Thursday included updated figures for the Durham-Orange Light Transit Rail project. The project cost has jumped to $3.3 billion, which includes construction, financing and other costs through 2062.

Orange and Durham will split the project’s $1.9 billion local cost with a cost-sharing agreement that is being renegotiated so Durham shoulders more of the cost to prevent depleting Orange County’s transit funds. The local costs increased after the anticipated state share decreased from 25 to 10 percent of project costs and financing and inflation were included in the price tag.

Elected officials in Durham say there is a strong interest in supporting the commuter rail, but the plans may have to be adjusted.

"We do feel it is an important component for the overall plan for transit in the region," Durham County Commissioner Ellen Reckhow said. "We do want to do it. There is commitment to do it, so we are still looking at when and how that would be funded."

Options could include raising money from other partners, possibly through a special transportation-related tax in the Research Triangle Park district. The current commuter-rail plan doesn’t include state funding, Reckhow said.

Durham County commissioners Chairwoman Wendy Jacobs said officials will work on solutions.

"I think there obviously will be adjustments that are going to have to be made in terms of the timing on how we will fill in some of the funding gaps," Jacobs said. "The important thing is we are as committed to doing the light rail as we are to doing the commuter rail."

Virginia Bridges: 919-829-8924, @virginiabridges

___ (c)2017 The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.) Visit The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.) at www.newsobserver.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

map

Where to partake in N.C. Beer Month celebrations in the Durham-Chapel Hill area

DURHAM

April is North Carolina Beer Month — which means, from the mountains to the beach, craft breweries and bottle shops are hosting events to celebrate one of the nation’s hotbeds of craft beer.

Those living or visiting the greater Durham area, which has seen a number of new breweries open shop in recent years, should be able to find a different place to visit every week in April for N.C. Beer Month.

A full list of events across the state can be found at ncbeermonth.com. A spattering of local events are listed below.

▪ Durham craft brewer Fullsteam Brewery is holding events every week during April. The events are focused around the brewing process, with educational sessions on grains (April 8), hops (April 15), and yeast (April 22). Fullsteam is bringing in experts on each subject.

Fullsteam wraps up beer month with a battle of the beers on April 29. The brewery’s employees will compete against each other to see who can brew the best beer made from North Carolina grains and at least one ingredient from the state and from a local company.

▪ Ponysaurus Brewing Co. is hosting the Bull City Food Swap at its brewery on Monday, April 17. The event gives guests the opportunity to drink beer and trade homegrown food.

▪ Tap the Triangle’s Friday Night Flights beer shuttle is running tours every Friday this month in Durham. The company is offering 20 percent off its tours during N.C. Beer Month and makes stops at Durty Bull Brewing Co., Ponysaurus, Startpoint Brewing, Ramblers Bottle Shop, Sam’s Quik Shop and Fullsteam.

▪ Bull City Burger and Brewery is releasing four one-off beers this month: a cask-conditioned Jack Tar Irish Stout with Amarena Cherries (April 1), a Mango Mint Mosaic Single Hop IPA (April 7), a bourbon barrel-aged Boars Russian Imperial Stout (April 14), and a Secret Sour Saison with Raspberries (April 21).

▪ Many of Durham’s bottle shops are also holding special N.C. Beer Month events. Bottle 501 will have a North Carolina brewery tap takeover every week. Beer Durham will host a party on Friday, April 7. Beer Study has a litany of events as well as Sam’s Quik Shop.

▪ Bull Durham Beer Co. is hosting free blues concerts every Wednesday and Friday in April at its new The Bullpen location on Blackwell Street. The music will be from various artists through the Music Maker Relief Foundation.

▪ Carrboro’s Steel String Brewery is hosting a cake bake-off on Saturday, April 8, in honor of the annual release of its Choco Freakness Imperial Cocoa Stout.

▪ Mystery Brewing is co-hosting a three-day block party in Hillsborough on April 28-30. The block party, called West Fest, will feature local musicians and beer from Mystery Brewing.

▪ Raleigh-centric Walter Magazine is hosting a beer tasting event at Pittsboro’s Fearrington Village on Sunday, April 9. The event runs from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. and features beers from Fullsteam Brewery, Mother Earth Brewing, Bond Brother Beer Co., Four Saints Brewing Co. and Tarboro Brewing Co.

Tickets are $25 per person and complimentary hors d’oeuvres, pop-up shops and live music from Gasoline Stove will be present.

▪ New Pittsboro cider maker Chatham Cider Works is hosting an open house at its cidery on April 15, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.

ball

Fresh start, home ties play into Juwan Durham’s exit from UConn

Connecticut’s Juwan Durham, a former standout at Tampa Prep, announced via Twitter on Monday that he is transferring after one season.
Durham, a 6-foot-11 forward, is the third player to leave the Huskies in the past month, joining fellow freshman Vance Jackson and sophomore Steven Enoch. UConn signee Makai Ashton-Langford also requested to be released from his letter of intent.
Terrapins coach Joe Fenlon said Durham’s decision was not strictly based on basketball.
“There were many factors that Juwan weighed before reaching his decision,” Fenlon said. “He just decided he needed a fresh start.”
There also was a desire to play closer to home.
“Maybe that’s in Florida, maybe it’s somewhere close to the state for Juwan,” Fenlon said. “He has some time to think this through.”
Durham committed to UConn in September 2015 after taking his official visit to the school. At the time of his commitment, he was considered a four-star recruit and a top-25 prospect in the 2016 class by nearly every major recruiting service. He was one of the rare bay area basketball stars who committed to a national title contender in the past decade.
Others in that elite group include former Gibbs/Admiral Farragut star Marreese Speights (Florida 2006-08), former Plant standout Michael Frazier (Florida 2012-15) and former Sickles star John Henson (North Carolina 2009-12).
Tampa Catholic forward Kevin Knox will be the next when makes his decision later this month.
Durham picked the Huskies over offers from more than a dozen major schools, including Indiana, Florida, Florida State, Miami and Louisville. UConn has won four national titles, the last coming in 2014.
Days after announcing his commitment, Durham tore the anterior cruciate ligament in his knee for the second time in a seven-month span. The injury ended his senior season before it started.
This season with the Huskies was the first time Durham returned to the court. Durham played in all 28 games as a freshman, averaging 1.6 points and 1.5 rebounds per game.
After Durham announced his decision to leave, Fenlon had a text from an ACC school inquiring about the coach’s former prized player.
“Juwan will have plenty of options,” Fenlon said.

ball

Fresh start, home ties play into Juwan Durham’s exit from UConn

Connecticut’s Juwan Durham, a former standout at Tampa Prep, announced via Twitter on Monday that he is transferring after one season.
Durham, a 6-foot-11 forward, is the third player to leave the Huskies in the past month, joining fellow freshman Vance Jackson and sophomore Steven Enoch. UConn signee Makai Ashton-Langford also requested to be released from his letter of intent.
Terrapins coach Joe Fenlon said Durham’s decision was not strictly based on basketball.
“There were many factors that Juwan weighed before reaching his decision,” Fenlon said. “He just decided he needed a fresh start.”
There also was a desire to play closer to home.
“Maybe that’s in Florida, maybe it’s somewhere close to the state for Juwan,” Fenlon said. “He has some time to think this through.”
Durham committed to UConn in September 2015 after taking his official visit to the school. At the time of his commitment, he was considered a four-star recruit and a top-25 prospect in the 2016 class by nearly every major recruiting service. He was one of the rare bay area basketball stars who committed to a national title contender in the past decade.
Others in that elite group include former Gibbs/Admiral Farragut star Marreese Speights (Florida 2006-08), former Plant standout Michael Frazier (Florida 2012-15) and former Sickles star John Henson (North Carolina 2009-12).
Tampa Catholic forward Kevin Knox will be the next when makes his decision later this month.
Durham picked the Huskies over offers from more than a dozen major schools, including Indiana, Florida, Florida State, Miami and Louisville. UConn has won four national titles, the last coming in 2014.
Days after announcing his commitment, Durham tore the anterior cruciate ligament in his knee for the second time in a seven-month span. The injury ended his senior season before it started.
This season with the Huskies was the first time Durham returned to the court. Durham played in all 28 games as a freshman, averaging 1.6 points and 1.5 rebounds per game.
After Durham announced his decision to leave, Fenlon had a text from an ACC school inquiring about the coach’s former prized player.
“Juwan will have plenty of options,” Fenlon said.

design

Durham students learn the dangers of texting while driving

Please install the latest Adobe Flash Player Plugin to watch this content.
DURHAM, N.C. (WNCN) — John Batey virtually died in a car accident Monday.
It was part of a texting while driving simulator that students at Hillside High School in Durham participated in Monday.
“It’s like interesting how I was able to actually see, because I’ve never been in an accident before, so to see what it’s like actually being in an accident,” said the senior.
Batey looked down at his phone several times during the simulation. It was an easy distraction, he said.
“It was just the noise that was kind of distracting me,” he said. “Every time it rang, I wanted to see what it was, but I knew I was driving so I couldn’t. “
In 2016, 177 people died in crashes in North Carolina that involved a distracted driver, state officials said. That’s a 9 percent increase from 2015.
When distracted driving does claim a life, high school officials are left trying to heal the community.
“To help heal a learning community when we find ourselves in situations like what’s presented behind us, where a student has lost his or her life,” said Hillsdale principal William Logan.
When Batey is in the car, he puts his phone in do-not-disturb mode, only allowing emergency calls.
“My mom, her phone call will come through, but like everything else, I don’t want a distraction because I’m driving and I value my life,” he said.
He also took a pledge not to text and drive.
If you’d like to learn more about the pledge or sign it, click here.
Play Video
Play
Loaded: 0%
Progress: 0%
Remaining Time -0:00
This is a modal window.
Foreground — White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan — Opaque Semi-Opaque
Background — White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan — Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent
Window — White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan — Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent
Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400%
Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow
Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps
Defaults Done

man

Notes from North Carolina: Full Frame’s Director on Engaging Outside the Triangle

I’d like to take a moment to slow things down a bit. In the current political climate, we find ourselves in unfamiliar territory. Amid the tectonic shifts underfoot, funding for the arts, including support for the NEA and by extension, Full Frame, may be at risk. Our world has changed – or so it seems.
Recently, I have been approached by several organizations about launching “rapid response” documentary teams in the South, and nationwide. Making documentaries suddenly seems more urgent, more needed and more relevant than ever, and a documentary film festival embedded here in the South seems like a natural partner.
Conversely, ever since the North Carolina legislature passed HB2 (aka The Bathroom Bill) last March, I have received many emails from out-of-state attendees, filmmakers and sponsors of Full Frame either questioning their support of the festival or asking if we have plans to move the event to, say, New York, where it somehow might better belong than in Durham, North Carolina.
The short answer to this is that Full Frame is a program of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, so no, it’s not going anywhere. That is how it was founded 20 years ago as the Double Take Documentary Film Festival, and that’s how it is now.
What stories filmmakers choose to cover is different than which audiences film festivals choose to serve. The economic – and, one could say, moral – mandate is that since we receive much of our funding from our region, we return this investment to the local economy, raising more tax revenue than is granted to us by any single government entity in just our four-day event. Our year-round programming and educational initiatives do even more. We serve Durham as well as the international documentary community, and we annually welcome many ticket buyers who come to be with us from outside the region. I do not see these things as being in conflict with one another.
But this begs a larger question about film festivals, and in particular documentary festivals, that has been nagging at me since well before the election of Donald Trump.
Durham, and the southern US, is complex. In Durham, the population is 48 percent people of color and the region has the highest level of education in the state, with many political and business leaders of color. Many folks in Durham grew up in rural parts of the state, but came to the Triangle (Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill) to attend college, at UNC, NC State, Duke or two miles from Full Frame at NC Central, an HBCU. They attended school and settled here, adding to the amazing makeup of our region: in next-door Wake County, decidedly more conservative; in Durham County, ethnically diverse and LGBTQ friendly. And in Chapel Hill, which the late Jesse Helms referred to as “The People’s Republic of Chapel Hill.”
Full Frame’s leadership, too, has deep southern roots. Sadie Tillery, our artistic director, is from North Carolina, and though I was raised “a Yankee,” half my family hails from small-town Arkansas.
And as for documentary film, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences gave 37 grants last year, two of them to documentary film organizations in Durham: The Southern Documentary Fund and Full Frame, for our School of Doc program. The region, it is safe to say, has been incredibly supportive of documentary filmmaking and curation.
There are well-meaning documentary professionals who benefit from screening in largely liberal and somewhat wealthy enclaves. Full Frame benefits from this, though one could hardly call the small county of Durham wealthy. So, I often wonder if we are not shouting into a self-congratulatory drum. This was a suspicion I felt when I worked in entertainment in Los Angeles, and the thought often arises when I attend many a well-funded documentary event in the US.
Last year, as festivals reacted to studies on the lack of female filmmakers or people of color, press releases counting the gender of filmmakers or sidebars for filmmakers of color appeared quickly. We stayed our course. Our numbers speak for themselves. Our laurels matter more to a filmmaker in our main programming than pulling them out for sidebars. Women and minorities have always been well represented, making up the majority of our Tribute recipients in the last several years, and last year, as HB2 raised its ugly head, we had already programmed no fewer than five films dealing with transgender issues – not in response to the law, but simply because that is how our festival rolls. The programming is reflective of the communities we serve, not a reaction to them. And still, despite keeping ticket prices low, growing programming and creating much free programming, we have not significantly increased the diversity of attendees at our event.
And so, while many organizations have stated that it is time to get out of our respective bubbles, and others want to double down on those bubbles, if you will, and fight harder for the marginalized voices documentary has always purported to represent, to me there are some very evident voices absent from our audience.
I now live in Minneapolis-St. Paul, but I was in Durham with our team on Election Day – and more importantly, the day after. Like many, they were broadsided and, without getting too descriptive, upset. I flew back north, reflecting on how all of us who lead in the field will react and respond. But my first impulse was instead to, above all, not react. I wanted us to just sit with this for a moment.
When I returned, I met with our local advisors and gave voice to a query: Have we for too long only served the audience that sits in our region? In this most divided state, where Durham County was the last site of the recount for our recently elected Democratic governor, have we, by trying to keep the festival small and intimate, become too “ex-clusive”?
Should we be reaching out into the rural communities of North Carolina? Should we be testing the theory we always trumpet – that these films draw people together in communities who do not have the privilege of having a festival in their town? And the answer was a resounding Yes. Let’s bring together rural and municipal communities, using the festival as a tool. The advisors at the table – all of whom live in the Triangle, but hail from Mt. Airy (the “real” Mayberry), Albemarle and small towns like Kinston, sitting with others who range from former Black Panther members to stalwart Republicans – grew animated and voiced that this could help “heal our state.”
But perhaps the most important voice came from Dr. Benjamin Reese, VP of Institutional Equity at Duke. “We must make sure we are not imposing what we think these communities need on them. We need to reach out and listen to community leaders who are there.”
This is key. Stop. Reach out. Listen, ask, enquire. We all speak eloquently about the power of film, and the ability of documentary film to effect change. And I often take this a step further, that not just watching films but watching them together on a big screen with a discussion is where the power of film comes to bear. If audiences are left out due to either economic or geographic forces, what changes are we effecting? Are we not left speaking to ourselves?
And in states like North Carolina, where festivals occur in places limited by their economy, but that celebrate our differences, who do we hurt if we boycott these regions?
I am incredibly proud of what we have added to the landscape of documentary film: #DocsSoWhite at Full Frame spawned conversations that carried well beyond April 2016; students like Destini Riley, who participated in our School of Doc, and whose film went on to be featured in The New York Times OpDocs, are diversifying the next generation of filmmakers with new voices; and of course, the four-day festival has launched important films and honored filmmakers before other large, well-funded events have.
Perhaps the minority voice we still have yet to include, while we adamantly maintain our focus on other, less-heard voices, is in another part of our state entirely: The regions where soldiers live and work, farmers and ranchers toil, and closed mills await their next act. I know there is great common ground on the issues we all hold dear in some of the films we screen, and the endangered voices in North Carolina, perhaps in our country, are those so disenfranchised they can’t believe a film festival would ever be in their backyard. And if we truly believe that documentary film festivals draw people together in their shared humanity, then we have more work to do.
But I also know that any small town will and perhaps should be suspicious of anyone toting a camera or a projector down Main Street. So, let’s slow down. America did not change overnight. There are folks whose stories we have been content to share, but not necessarily content to sit with in their own communities.
And so, I tell those who write to ask if we plan to move Full Frame, No, we would not move even if we could. The work we have to do is, in fact, right here. And we welcome you to join us.
Deirdre Haj is festival director of the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, which runs from April 6-9 in Durham, NC.
Tags:
Festivals

factory

Fiery head-on collision during chase near Person-Durham County line

TIMBERLAKE, North Carolina (WTVD) —
There’s been a fiery fatal head-on collision during a chase along U.S. Hwy 501 just south of Timberlake near the Person County-Durham County line.
Pictures from Chopper 11 HD showed a burned-out vehicle on its side in the median just south of the NC Hwy 57 (Hillsborough Road) junction.
There was another SUV with severe front-end damage.
Heading to scene of fiery crash just over PersonCo line. #ABC11 eyewitness just sent us this picture. pic.twitter.com/a1FTbrzYn7
— Elaina Athans (@AthansABC11) April 3, 2017
Roxboro Police Chief David Hess said it all began when his officers were doing a safety checkpoint in the area of Foushee Street and Garret Street. A vehicle made a U-turn about 500 yards away and left the area.
Police put out a Be On The Lookout (BOLO) for the vehicle, but Hess said his officers did not give chase.
Person County sheriff’s deputies spotted the stolen car with a wanted person inside and were following it when the crash happened. Witnesses said the car was driving erratically before the collision in the northbound lanes.
“Our hearts are heavy for the loss of life today in this tragic police chase,” Chief Hess said. “Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families and deputies involved in this horrific tragedy. Anytime someone chooses to flee the danger increases. Simply complying with the traffic laws may have allowed this incident not to occur. This is a tragic loss of life.”
The dead person has not been identified.
The southbound lanes are closed while investigators work the scene.
Report a Typo

Durham NC Is A Great Place To Live If You Work In Education

Durham NC is a great place to live if you work in education. This is especially true if you are seeking employment at a college, university, or other educational institution of higher learning.

A number of the nation’s most prestigious colleges are centered in this area, and they are also some of the biggest schools in the state of North Carolina. Durham is home to Duke University, but Chapel Hill is only minutes away and home to the University of North Carolina’s primary campus.

Raleigh is not too distant either and home to North Carolina State University. Yet another Atlantic Coast Conference school with many tens of thousands of students, Wake Forest, is also within a decent daily commuting distance. On top of that, smaller or lesser-known schools like the University of North Carolina Greensboro are within a practical commute too.

Collectively, the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill “Triangle” area has hundreds of thousands of college and university students who need teaching. That’s on top of the fact that this multiple-county metropolitan area rivals Charlotte as the largest population center in the state, meaning there are also hundreds of thousands of elementary, middle, and high school students also needing an education. Wake County’s school system alone is one of the biggest in this state, which ranks in top ten in population nationally.

Quality of life is very high in this area, thanks to sprawling suburbs and lots of space. Winters are very mild, and Interstates 40, 85, and 95 provide easy access to many nearby regions for travel, be it business or pleasure. The beaches of the Atlantic are not too far to the east, and the Appalachian Mountains are only hours to the west. Durham is a great place to live and travel out of.